Cpd 131

How effective was the technique in reducing your stress In doing this little experiment I learned a great deal about myself and thinking that I would just resort back to old habits and not learn anything from this technique I was definitely wrong and those around me undeniably quite shocked as to my behavior. You must get in-touch with you, it is more of a self-awareness because that is who we are ultimately responsible for ourselves and our own actions.

What I did was when I found myself getting upset, I would remove myself from the room or situation in a manner that was non-abrasive or threaten to anyone or anything, I did not go slamming a door when I left or look over my shoulder and state Ill be right back, with the look added in for good measure. I just left the area or hung up the phone after saying what it was I was doing and politely said good bye and I gave myself a timeout of sorts. If I got really angry I would smell lavender which is known to be a calming aroma that is known to calm those who are upset. Time needed during each session and frequency of session this depended on the anger, and how mad I was. Sometimes it can only take 10 minutes, and other times it may take longer. Equipment and space needed: Candles, good walking shoes, lavender, and maybe an mp3 player to play some classical music. Whatever one needs to bring them to a happy place, and calm down.

We all face the pressures and stress of life everyday. The job, the family, other individuals, emergencies, even “things” drive us crazy or “push our buttons” at times. We try to rationalize and keep our cool, but most of the time it is just a cover up and short term solutions to the problems. Reacting is important but how you react can determine how well you handle difficult situations.

Physical symptoms I personally experienced were: headaches (specifically tension headaches), nausea, dizziness, sleep difficulties, tight neck and shoulders, racing heart, trembling hands, and restlessness. Behavioral symptoms I felt were: a definite excess in smoking, bossiness towards others, compulsive gum chewing, I became critical of others, grinding of my teeth so hard that I am forced to wear a mouthpiece at night, and an inability to finish what I start. Some of the emotional symptoms included: crying, anxiety, nervousness, boredom, edginess, overwhelming sense of pressure, overwhelming anger, being unhappy for no reason, and very testy. Cognitive symptoms that I felt were: trouble thinking clearly, forgetfulness, writers block, long-term memory loss, inability to make decisions, and constant excessive worry.

Spiritual aspects of stress that I felt: doubt, unforgiving, apathy, and a strong feeling for the need of acceptance.

I am completely committed to working on my own anger management and will continue to do so.

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